Research Ethics and Possible Effects of Practicing Aversion Techniques in Research to Manage Self Injurious Behavior in Children with Special Needs

Authors

  • Farah Sharif University of Home Economics, Lahore
  • Amina Muazzam Lahore College for Women University
  • Zarrrin Atif Riphah International University, Lahore

Abstract

This study highlights the ethical implications regarding management of self-injurious behavior, using aversive techniques for research purposes. The case analysis of Rapoff study (1980) on a blind child to reduce his self-injurious behavior was done to amplify the consequences of punishment techniques in research. Moreover, the replication risk of such research, that could magnify the repercussions in cultural context of low middle income countries like Pakistan, is also discussed. It is concerning that methodology of Rapoff considering the short-term positive results and good intention of the researcher. The exploration revealed that the simultaneous practice of contrasting techniques of reinforcement and punishment, training parents to punish child and inflicting discomfort to an already vulnerable child were the major concerning issues in study. It is concluded that, care must be taken while practicing research with children, in a bid to inhibit the risk of misuse or malpractice to seek benefits. The study also supports the use of higher ethical standards in research methodologies, that align with cultural context of Pakistani society, when working with the population vulnerable to self-harm.

Key Words: Rapoff Study, Aversion Techniques, Self-Injurious Behavior, Research Ethics, Pakistani Society

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Published

2024-04-27

How to Cite

Farah Sharif, Amina Muazzam, & Zarrrin Atif. (2024). Research Ethics and Possible Effects of Practicing Aversion Techniques in Research to Manage Self Injurious Behavior in Children with Special Needs. Journal of Business and Management Research, 3(1), 639–647. Retrieved from https://jbmr.com.pk/index.php/Journal/article/view/156